Carolina Reaper, Ghost Pepper, and Trinidad Scorpion Have Been Seeded!

I seeded my super hots and my “just plain hot” peppers over the last couple of days.

The superhots: Carolina Reaper, purportedly the hottest pepper in the world, the Ghost pepper, aka Bhut Jolokia, and the Trinidad Scorpion can take up to 8 weeks to germinate.

The normal hot peppers (ones that are not reported to set your head on fire) that I planted are Thai, two kinds of Habanero, Serrano, Cayenne, Hungarian Hot Wax and Chinese Five Color can also be slow. I do know they are slow to grow, hence my starting them in January. Next week I will sow the rest of them. The sweet bells, non sweet bells and the medium hots like Jalapenos, Poblanos etc.

The funny thing is that I am of hispanic descent yet I don’t like anything even remotely spicy! Wait, I do have a caveat to that statement. I will use the smallest piece of jalapeno that I can get away with in my salsas for flavor. And I mince it to dust at that.

Carolina_Reaper_Pilemaya pepper chinese five color hungarian yellow wax Trinidad-Scorpion-Hot-Pepper

The Letter of the Day is M: “M” is for Mortgage Lifter and Maules Red Hot, a Cayenne Type of Pepper

Mortgage Lifter

These long time favorites are also known as Radiator Charlie. They produce good yields of large, smooth, pink-skinned fruits and have few seeds, even in times of drought. Mild and delectable sweet flavor.

I like these a lot, last year we had 1-2 lb. tomatoes. Yummy. The back story on this is very interesting and one of the reasons I like heirloom tomatoes. In a nutshell, during the Depression there was a gentleman who raised these tomato plants and sold them for $1.00, a hefty sum back then, and was able to pay off his $6000 dollar mortgage in 6 years. It is also known as Radiator Charlie due to the fact he owned a radiator shop.

Indeterminate

75-85 days

Image

Maules Red Hot

Great for Northern areas, these peppers will give you loads of 10” long cayenne type peppers. They mature from green to red with a flavor that is excellent for hot sauces or making dried pepper flakes.

these were a bonus seed that I rec’d from a seed company. Any variety that works well in the north with it;s shorter season is something I want to promote.

Image

Onions are up and Hot Peppers planted

ImageImageImageearly jalapeno

Onions are up! Impatiens are up! Snapdragons and lobelia too! It’s nice to see signs of spring, even if it’s only under lights in the house.  Oh, and I have Yugoslavian Buttercrunch coming up too.

I tried something different with my onions, I planted them individually in plug trays since they don’t seem to like being transplanted at a young age.

Yesterday I planted hot peppers, Hot peppers are notoriously slow to germinate and then sometimes they are spotty. Depends on the freshness of the seed and the variety. First I soaked them in weak tea. Pain in the butt to separate them, stuck to my fingers. Here is the list: Arbol, Bhut Jolokia (yes, the infamous ghost), Cayenne, Early Jalapeno, Habanero, Hungarian Yellow Wax, Maules Red Hot, Pasilla, Pepperoncini, Serrano, Tabasco, Anaheim, Shishitso

I don’t like hot peppers although I have been know to use a smidgen of jalapeno in my salsa.

We’ve had snow and cold weather until the pineapple express rolled in last night. Now it’s 45 degrees. Melting all our snow.